Throwback Thursday: Meeting the Bros boys



It's not every day you get to hang out with Luke and Matt Goss, but in 2019 I got to do just that over lunch at the Savoy Hotel - and what a thrill it was for a former Brosette who saw them live in their late-80s/early-90s heyday more times than I can remember.

They seemed genuinely chuffed when I told them I was at their 1989 Wembley Stadium concert and amused when I recalled that, a bit worse for beer in the baking sunshine, I had to have a quick nap during the support acts.

The epitome of decent blokes, here's what they had to say about the reaction to the After the Screaming Stops documentary, hardcore arguments and why it's nice being embraced by Britain again


On their famous bust-ups…

Luke: We’ve only had two massive fights and that’s it, which is pretty good for us.

Matt: But we argue hardcore. We argue at a different level.

On being mistaken for being earnest in the documentary…

Matt: I’m quite a silly guy. If you deliver something that’s dry and you don’t laugh at it yourself it can be misread, like you’re not cerebral enough to have a sense of humour. And a lot of people have said to me ‘It’s good to know we’re not the only nuts family - your family is as nuts as we are’.

On being embraced by Britain again after tabloid ridicule in the 90s…

Luke: It’s nice not having trepidation or fear about coming home. To be honest I felt somewhat exiled and that was heartbreaking. It’s Great Britain and I’m a British boy, but I didn’t know if it would ever change. It wasn’t a bitter feeling in any way, it was a sadness and an acceptance. There was a lot of ridicule.

Matt: Now there’s more accountability because you can correct it in real time on social media. It was so hard back then, though, because we were only 23 or 24. In America ‘success’ is a good word and if you aspire to anything, to elevate and inform yourself, you can do really well. Now we don’t sweat it so much because we have lives elsewhere.


On the loss of their mum…

Matt: I’m still very much dealing with my mother’s loss. I wasn’t ready for that acknowledgement because I hadn’t personally acknowledged it in my life. I didn’t feel right to me. I need to look into grief counselling at some point because I think there is a fear that if I heal then I’ll lose her even more. When I saw it in the film it was like a direct hit to the heart, then to see my brother in pain hurt me deeply. I choose not to watch those parts of the film because it’s still very painful to me.

On that legendary French & Saunders mickey-take…

Matt: I felt embarrassed about it, if I’m honest. Then you grow up and think ‘That’s a massive compliment’ because I’m a big fan of what they do.

On rebellious Brosettes…

Matt: It feels like everything is very corporate these days but back then there was a sense of rebellion, as crazy as that may sound. If you really think about it, the fans were bunking off school and to this days there are thousands of friendships that were formed because of Bros. They meet up before gigs and they know all the songs.


On justice for the fans now...

Luke: A lot of them have said how happy they are that we’ve come back together. The fans have also been on the ridicule train back in the day. Brosettes weren’t spoken about favourably but now they too are receiving a lot of love, as are we. They feel validated because their day has come.


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